THE SOURCE: EDUCATION TOPICS

Attachment

 

ATTACHMENT

The way one person connects to another person is their attachment style. This style is formed early on in life based on the way that significant adults have interacted with the young children they take care of.

It’s how our attachments are formed that makes us secure or insecure in our relationships. As we grow and interact with more people, our attachment style can evolve and change.

The Source | Education Topics | Attachment

Picture caption goes here.

Dr. Tina Payne Bryson explains how to improve attachment with your child

YouTube Channel: Kids In The House

Tina Payne Bryson, PhD Psychotherapist & Author, shares advice for parents on the best methods for improving attachments with your children.

Further Reading

This Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) handout takes a deeper look at attachment and what caregivers can do.

Although it is not common, sometimes disrupted attachment can lead to serious difficulties for children’s way of relating to others. In these cases, it is important to seek help to determine if an attachment disorder is present.

The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry has a Facts for Families page about attachment disorders.

The Source • Youth Mental Health Network

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For the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline call 1-800-273-8255 or text the word ‘home’ to 741741 for Crisis Text Line.

IF THIS IS AN EMERGENCY CALL 911 or GO TO NEAREST EMERGENCY ROOM

For the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline call 1-800-273-8255 or text the word ‘home’ to 741741 for Crisis Text Line.

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